Chefs often use alcohol in various recipes to add flavor to a dish, and there is a prevailing idea that any alcohol used burns off during cooking. Unfortunately, that is not completely true, which means that you could end up facing a DUI charge if you drive after a meal made with the substance. 

Business Insider explains that while you are not likely to feel the effects of the alcohol you consume in food, it still affects your blood alcohol level. With the legal limit set at 0.08%, there is not much room for error, and if you have a drink with dinner, then you definitely put yourself at risk for driving under the influence. 

Simmering and baking 

Simmering is cooking food over a low heat with a cover on it, while baking is preparing food in an oven. These methods remove a majority of the alcohol content, the most of any cooking method. Experts state it will reduce the content by two-thirds after 30 minutes. 

Reductions 

Many foods made with alcohol use it as an ingredient in a reduction, which is a sauce that thickens by removing it from the heat after boiling. Experts say 85% of the alcohol content remains in a reduction. 

Non-cooked dishes 

Chefs may add alcohol to some dishes without cooking them. For example, a whipped topping flavored with rum would not require cooking. With no heat applied, there is zero alcohol content lost. You will not likely have a full serving of alcohol in such a dish, but it can still raise you above the legal limit.