The best of divorces typically still cause a range of negative emotions such as grief, anger, fear and anxiety. When the break-up is hostile, couples in Pennsylvania may experience these feelings to a degree that they begin having physical health problems.

What can individuals do to lessen the effects of the hostility?

  1. Plan ahead for communication

According to the American Psychological Association, communicating with a spouse may cause considerable distress, which can make it difficult to focus on matters that must be worked through before the divorce can be finalized. Experts recommend sitting down and making a list of points to discuss at a time when stress is lower. Then, when it comes time to talk, it may be easier to set aside negative emotions and stick to the business of ending the marriage. With fewer chances to argue, spouses may find some relief from the emotional trauma.

  1. Limit communication

Psych Central points out that in-person conversations and even texting have the potential to become heated quickly. It may help to keep all communication outside of negotiations to email, and only read and answer them at a certain time of day. Having the rest of the day free of disputes and conflict may contribute to restoring emotional equilibrium. Not only that, it may be easier to remember to carefully proofread emails rather than shooting them off quickly on the spur of the moment.

  1. Seek stress relief

Speaking with a trusted family member, friend or counselor who can offer emotional support may serve as an outlet for frustrations and an opportunity to put things in perspective. Muscle relaxation techniques, meditation, exercise and yoga may also help restore mental and physical balance.