Pennsylvania couples who decide to split may not always leave on the best of terms. Sometimes, an amicable divorce is not within the realm of possibility. Unfortunately, hostile divorces can have a big impact on your child’s mental health.

The way divorce impacts a child differs depending on the child’s temperament and how the divorce goes. Some children are better equipped for handling stressful situations. Some divorces are amicable, which can minimize psychological damage. However, some divorces are hostile and some children do not cope well with it.

There can be many signs that a child is not handling the divorce well. They may withdraw or begin to lash out. They may develop strange behavioral ticks. Some children no longer get along with their peers. They may develop an opposition to all authority figures, which can get them into trouble at school. Some act out while others become depressed and guilt-ridden. As a note, parents should understand that you are never “too young” to suffer from a mental illness. Do not dismiss symptoms of anxiety or depression because your child is young.

If these issues are not dealt with, your child may develop permanent behavioral and coping problems that can affect them for the rest of their life. Fortunately, even in hostile divorces, there are ways to ensure the safety of your child.

If you want to learn more about the child psychology behind handling a parent’s divorce, consider visiting our web page. You can start by reading more about hostile versus amicable divorce. By understanding what makes a divorce hostile, you can also begin to understand the effects it may have on a child in the short and long term.