As children get older and circumstances change, many families may find that their original custody arrangement no longer works. In this situation, they can request a modification.

The custody arrangement that people receive from a Pennsylvania court is usually not a permanent situation. According to Divorce magazine, people can request a child custody modification for several reasons.

Factors in modification

Parents may ask for a new custody arrangement if one of them relocated. If the noncustodial parent lives more than 50 miles from the children, courts may allow this parent to have more time with the children. People may also modify custody if one of them gets a job that allows them to spend more time with the children or if one parent will need to travel more frequently.

When a court originally ruled on child custody, one parent may not have been in a position to care for the children. Some parents may have struggled with addiction or illness when the divorce was taking place. As people experience positive changes in their personal lives, they may be able to modify their custody arrangement.

The children’s best interests

Before modifying the custody arrangement, courts try to determine what will be best for the children. According to the Child Welfare Information Gateway, a court considers a parent’s ability to care for the children. Additionally, they examine the relationship that the children have with both parents and the unique needs of each child. After considering all these factors, a court may agree that a modification is necessary.

Many parents may think that a request for modification will always result in a new custody arrangement. However, Pennsylvania courts may only grant this request if they think it will be best for the whole family